Norway

When we bought the Ioniq, we almost jokingly said we now had an excuse to goto Norway,  to test out the charging network. A few weeks later we decided we would drive there. Neither of us had ever been to Scandinavia, so it would be a total adventure for us. 

Planning.

In advance I obtained charge cards from Fortum Charge&drive and Grønn Kontakt for Norway and Clever for Denmark & Sweden. Additionally, I registered for a toll transponder and registered with Toll Collect so we could use the toll roads free of charge. I also watched many many hours of YouTube videos about Norway, and of course TeslaBjørns road-trips  to get an idea of where to go and how charging is. Of course a route needed to be considered, but nothing fixed was planned. My initial thoughts, once we arrived at Oslo was to go south via Kristensand , around the coast to Stavanger, then up to Bergen, onwards over Trollstigen, the Atlantic Road and onto Trondheim. Then if time and funds allowed further north maybe to Lofoten, before returning direct to Oslo. My wife had been keeping an eye on the weather in Norway for a month before we went on holiday, and they had a heat wave of 30C. She was happy.   Accommodation was not even considered at this point, but I already had concerns about the cost of hotels. As we know however, the best laid plans of mice and men so often go astray. so its better not to plan too much!

The trip

I suffer from back problems, and the week before the trip, the pain was so bad it threatened to cause a cancellation of the trip. I spent the best part of the week pumping myself full of pain killers which helped, but come Saturday, I felt I could not travel so we had to stay at home. Sunday was a bit better, but I was still not fit for a long drive. Monday morning I decided it was ok, and we set off around 10am.

Day 1

I wont go into all the details of the trip as a lot is not so interesting to tell. We headed in the direction of Berlin. WE had one issue on the first day of a charge being out of order, and thus had to backtrack and goto a BMW dealer in Lauf and der Pregnitz. We had charged at the dealer before and just like the first time, the offered us a coffee whilst we charged. Thats service. As we take it easy whilst driving, and enjoy the drive as part of the trip, by the late afternoon we reached Spandau and spent the night there.

Day 2

After a relaxed breakfast, we continued onto Lübeck and spent a couple of hours looking around the town. Certainly a place to return to sometime. On the way there we stopped at a recharging point on the motorway and as so often happens we were bombarded by questions about the EV and infrastructure. After leaving Lübeck we headed to wards Flensburg. We didn’t get that far but in the late afternoon checked into a hotel run by a nice Russian guy in Rendsburg. He was interested in our journey and was surprised we were in an EV. I suggest to him that he should get a charge point or two, and mentioned that he could get a couple of destination chargers via Tesla, which he said he would look into.

Day 3

The route continued via a VW dealer in Flensburg, where we could recharge for free. Whilst waiting I thought it would be nice to look at an e-Golf. Of course they didn’t have one, and the dealer told be that it was not possible to order the e-Golf  as it was no longer being made, and I should consider a GTI.  I don’t know if it’s true that the e-Golf is no longer in production, but if it is, then it really shows just how uncommitted VW is to the EV platform, and calls into question if the concepts they have been showing will ever be made. After Flensburg we crossed over into Denmark. The total cost of the recharging for Munich Flensburg was a wapping €1,50! In Denmark I really wanted to goto Copenhagen. when searching booking.com, we couldn’t find any accommodation under €800 per night. So we parked up for 2 hours, visited the little mermaid after fighting our way through a bus load of Chinese tourists, and took a few photos. back into the city, had a coffee and left. The next road took us through the tunnel and over the bridge to Malmö. I was not impressed with Malmö. The bits we saw were just ugly. Also getting a charge was an issue as the e-on charger just wouldn’t work. I kept getting an error that said the car requested too much power. After 4 or 5 attempts I gave up and went to a circle K, where the charger worked at once without any problems. After a charge and a coffee and enjoying a very nice evening sunshine, we continued up to the sleepy town of Landeskrona, the home of Tycho Brahe. 

Day 4

The hotel in Landeskrona had only 4 rooms and a shared bathroom, so breakfast was in a local bakery. The morning was chilly, and as we continued north to Gothenburg or started to rain a bit. Not much but enough to annoy. The temperature was also sinking, so when we reached Gothenburg it was windy and cold. We had a walk around for a while and had a meal. I didn’t want to stop very long here as I wanted to reach Oslo if possible. So after a couple of hours or so we were back on the road. The motorway up the coast is a bit boring and really not much to see. We reached the border with Norway about 5pm or so, and the heavens opened reducing visibility to next to nothing. What a welcome! by the time we reached our hotel in Oslo, which we booked at a stop a bit earlier, the weather was a bit better but still very cloudy and rainy. The only hotel we could find at an affordable price was about 6km outside of Oslo, a hostel, up in the hills with “a fantastic view across Oslo”. Not when we arrived though as it was in the middle of a cloud. We arrived about 8pm and had only a few minutes to get into ur room before the restaurant closed at 8:30pm. The food was terrible, cold and expensive.

Day 5

In Oslo we visited one of the EV only parking places inside an ancient fort. It was very narrow. The parking had places for 100EV, but there was no place available. The number of EV in Oslo is incredible. Our time in the city was way too short, and its a place I would like to do a fly stay sometime. We needed now to decide how we were going to proceed, either go clockwise or anti clockwise along the coast. We decided Anti Clockwise, so set off for Trondheim. We made a stop at Nebbenes to look at the Tesla Supercharger station which has something like 30 chargers, and have a recharge ourselves. The station is really impressive. By the evening we were in Trondheim and checked into a Summer hotel run by students for 2 nights. The rest of the year the hotel is student accommodation, and it reminded me of my accommodation in military barracks. In the  evening we had a nice meal in a sort of pub restaurant.

Day 6

Trondheim. We walked around the town, which has its nice points.  Whilst walking around we charged the car in an underground garage. Today, the charge for the charge hasn’t appeared on my account. During the day we made a short north to Levanger, the most northerly point on our trip. This evening we had an Indian in a sort of take away place. The portions were very large, it was cheap (for Norway), but I didn’t enjoy it really.

Day 7

After leaving Trondheim we headed for the Atlantic Road. The weather started cold and rainy, but as the morning progressed, the weather improved. We passed by many small villages and some very beautiful fjords. When we reached the tollbooth for the Atlantic road I asked if there was a discount for an EV and was told for EVs it was free of charge. This was one of 2 times that we had a reduction. The other being on a ferry where I only had to pay for my wife, the EV and myself being free. All other ferries we were told the discounts had been stopped. The Atlantic road, whilst short, is a nice drive. There are a few places where its possible to pull over and go for a short walk, but it was raining again and extremely windy.  I had a drone with me, that I bought specifically to film the road a bit from over the sea, but the weather was just too bad to attempt a flight. As for accommodation, we booked first a tiny house, and got a confirmation, but the owner phoned us and  told us he was booked out, and we would have to cancel it over the website. His cancellation policy meant we would lose the cost of the room, which annoyed me. It took a good week for booking.com to refund the payment. We ended up in a house in the middle of nowhere which had about 5 or 6 rooms, a shared lounge and kitchen. The closest restaurant was about 12km away, a rather bad pizza place.

Day 8

The highlight of the day, and the trip, was to be Trollstigen.  We left the accommodation about 9 and soon thereafter the rain started again. At some of the ferry crossings we could hardly see the ferry docking due to the rain. By the time we reached Åndalsnes, and time to charge the car, the rain had eased a bit, so we had an hour to look around and buy a few presents for our cat sitter.  We made our way to the foot of Trollstigen with patchy drizzle. Luckily as we went up the pass it wasn’t raining so we could see its beauty without being stuck in a cloud. I love driving mountain passes, and this one is not difficult at all. Sometimes its a bit narrow however and you do have to make room for the coaches that are shuttling tourists around. I think this would be more of an issue for people in motorhomes. At the top of the pass is the obligatory souvenir shop and cafe, but also a nice walk to lookout platforms over the road. Well, it would be nice it it was sunny, but once again it was raining, very windy and cold. Still, despite this, it was the highlight of the trip for me. We continued along the road past some very nice waterfalls and landscape to Geiranger, where again it poured down without pause. One of the things that impressed me here was the number of charging stations for of all things Twizzys that can be rented. We must have seen at least 50 that were charging, and be the fast charger there were again a very large number (20 or more) of type 2 and 2 pin sockets. Geiranger its sell is very forgettable it it wasn’t for the fjord. I had wanted to take a boat to see the 7 sister waterfalls, but there were no boats running. 

Day 9

Overnight the rain didn’t stop, and I saw a sign saying the road was closed due to the weather, but there was no indication if the sign was up to date or not. The hotel receptionist said the road was open but could be slippery. Our target for the day was going to be Bergen but this didn’t happen. As we went up the hill the weather got worse and worse, the temperature dropped to 2c and then it started to snow. I was not equipped for winter weather, and I was not really happy about driving for hours on end in rain where I can hardly see anything. Checking the weather forecast for the next few days showed that there was no improvement in sight, in fact the rain was forecast to get worse. So the decision was made to head home. We changed direction and headed to Hønefoss. One thing we still wanted to see was some stave churches. We had seen one or two on the way, but they were all locked, so we planned the way back so we had a chance to see some more, and hopefully find one open. The one at Lillehammer was closed when we got there as was one other which was closed due to a funeral. Our hotel at Hønefoss had a few EV charging points, but it turned out these were normal 2 pin sockets. In the online forums, it was said the EU ICCB would not work in Norway because of a different earthing system. There is actually a different ICCB version delivered in Norway. I decided to try mine anyway as I was there and at least see for myself what the error would look like. Much to my surprise my ICCB worked perfectly, and in the morning I had 100% charge. I have no idea why this worked, as its well known that usually they don’t work, and other brands like Juice Booster 2, Go-eCharge, and NRGkick, have a Norway mode. 

Day 10

Today was to be our chance to see the inside of a Stave church, and the largest one inNorway, at Heddal. It was about 2 hours drive from Hønefoss, but it was worth it. The church is very interesting and has a lot of historical interest, and even some ancient rune graffiti which is only partially translated. We had to backtrack towards Oslo and took the tunnel under the fjord to get back onto the road to Sweden, stopping for the night at Fredrikstad. We asked the very nice receptionist to recommend a good restaurant where we could get real Norwegian food, as we had only had Norwegian once. She told us there was one in the town and we went to the place she stated, to find out it was a burger grill. Not what we wanted, so we ended up going to a Greek. As it turns out, the brother of the owner, has a restaurant on Crete, in the village next to where we have a house!

Day 11-12

I have merged these days together as there is nothing of interest to speak about, unless you think a lunch in IKEA is interesting. The charger at IKEA was 2Kw and one returning to the car the rain was so heavily that the cable was sitting in 1cm of rain water. We did have a tail wind most of the way which meant we have a good kWh/100km.

Day 13

Our return into Germany was marked by a drastic reduction of charge points. We wanted to charge in Celle, there was one “rapid” charger which was blocked by a local Tesla Model S 75D (?) plugged into the type 2 charge port. It had been connected 36 minutes and had taken 2kWh. The CCS would not start until the other charge session was completed. There was no indication of how long this would take. According to the ChargEV app there was another charger at Braunschweig which woe could reach with 20Km to spare. When we arrived we discovered that it was not compatible with any of our RFID cards and it needs a card from the local electricity company. Our hotel had no chargepoint of course. Cutting a long story short we managed to get a bit of a charge at the local DEKRA building with the new motion roaming and then whilst checking the ChargEV app again discovered and Audi/VW dealer about 8km away that had a rapid charger. We made it to the charger and got a charge to about 80% before giving up the charger to another Ioniq from Frankfurt that also needed a charge.

Day 14

A quick return to the Audi dealer to complete our charge before a very frustrating drive back to Munich. The charging infrastructure in Germany is very poor in comparison with Norway. We had to zigzag all over the place to find chargers which took a lot of time. We also had a couple of chargers that were not working. Very frustrating.

Summary

At the end of our trip we had circa 64 charging sessions, covered 5756km and spent about 100€ total on electricity. Would I do the trip again ? Yes. For Bergen and the coast I would probably go on a cruise, as the distances are large. If I was to go there again, I would want to go all the way to Nordkapp, maybe via Sweden. The costs in Norway for food is high,  a pizza costs €18 and a sandwich is from about €8. On the other hand at circle K you can have a years supply of coffee in a circle K mug for 33€. Compared to Germany, accommodation the is also a bit expensive with a cheap hotel starting at about €100 a night including breakfast buffet. if you want a better hotel you are looking at prices from €150. Our most expensive hotel was €185 which as the hotel at Geiranger. We booked for €150 via booking.com but the hotel increased the price when we checked in for exactly the same room.

 

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Going to Norway

Our next (sort of) planned, trip will be in about 2 weeks to Norway.

I have not actually made any plans, other than get a couple of charge cards and accounts for that area and get a toll road transponder. We have no idea where to go, but we wills stop at Copenhagen, and then drive over the bridge to Sweden. From there up the coast over Gothenburg to Oslo, and then….its open. I am thinking Trondheim, and then the Atlantic road, or maybe further north. I know we cant reach Nordkap, partially as there are no (?) rapid chargers, and my Granny cable wont work in Norway, but also due to time/money. We will see where exactly we end up. One thing is for sure, it will all be new and interesting for us.

Recomendations on where to go are welcome!

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Bayerischer Wald

We went for a short drive today, only to the Bayerische Wald. We had wanted to try to get to Klatovy in the Czech Republic but as we approached the border the weather started to go grey and it started to rain, so we turned towards Zwiesel, where I have never been, but it was even worse rain there. So we came home again. We did try out a fast charger at Teisnach technology canter, but it was defective. However across the woad is the main office from E-Wald, and as luck would have it there was a guy in the garage there doing something with an electric VW Beetle. At that location there is also a rapid charger, which looks very temporary, so we asked if we could charge and they said yes. It was free which was good. Otherwise, a free charge at the BMW factory in Dingolfing, a short walk and free top up at Deggendorf was about all for the trip.

Zwiesel might be a place to go back to one day to visit the glassworks perhaps.

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Namlos and Bschlaber Tals

It was Whitsuntide and Whitsunday the weather was not good so the tour we had planned was postponed to Monday. At least it wasn’t so bad Monday, so it was down to the car and time for a tour. I wanted to try out a video camera in the car to record the drive as well, so first I spent a few minuted setting that up in the car.

The plan was to go via Linderhof to the Namlos Tal. I had never heard of this place e, but it is not really so far away. The drive was easy of course, but my concern was where to charge. According to the apps I have, there are no rapid chargers in the area, only a couple of type 2, and I really don’t want to hang around in the middle of nowhere to charge for hours on end. So I chose the BMW hotel at Ammerwald where there is a free CCS. Its also a good place to stop for a coffee and the toilet. I arrived with about 43% charge, and the car told me I would need about 30 minutes to reach a full charge. Charge started timer on iPhone set and off to the hotel. 25 minutes later we returned to find the car had not charged. The charge had failed with a communication error after only 5 minutes. Annoying. Anyway,Chantal went for a short walk, and I stayed at the car and monitored the charge until it ended. It only took 15 minutes. The road is nice in this area, typical Austrian tan road with a nice lake to one side. It is not a fast road, but it is relaxing.

We reached the Namlos Tal easily and had a pleasant drive along the valley. It is an attractive place only 10Km or so long. However, the number of crazy motorcyclists driving way to fast and often on the wrong side of the road spots it. The motorbikes also make it a very noisy place. Our charge level was very good, I don’t remember how high it was but the drive up to the top of the valley and the decent basically more or less cancelled out.

So there was no need to look for a charger and we decided to have another pass, this time the Bschlabertal, also an unknown valley for me. The peak of the Bschlabertal is about 1900m I think. It is very bleak and there was still quiet a bit of snow off to the side of the road. The decent is quiet narrow and very windy, with an impressive view. As a driver you feel like your on a ledge on the side of the cliff. In addition there was also again a large number of mad motorcyclists risking their lives. Crash at those speeds on that road and you won’t live to tell the tale, you could easily end up smashed against the cliff or catapult over the railings and fall to your death.

After the Bschlabertal We decided to start home as the weather was deteriorating. First we needed to get a quick top up, from 65% to make it home. We went to a charger at Ötztal-Bahnhof and used the Maingau charge card where we fully charged in about 15 minutes. We returned home via Mittenwald and the Kochelsee. This was a mistake as we had a 45 minute delay due to traffic at Kochel. Something I also noticed is that the navigation in the Ioniq is sometimes very strange on its routing algorithm. I had selected Fastest route no motorway, expecting it to put me more or less parallel to the Munich autobahn, but instead of heading toward Munich, it took me due east and then north, brining me into Munich from the south east. We were originally south west of Munich, and there is a nice fast road which goes most of the way. The route it took was through a lot of winding side roads. Very strange.

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Romeo, Romeo, therefor art thou Romeo? Or to put it another way, lets goto Verona!

Italy has been outside my comfort zone when it comes to using my Ioniq Electric. To understand why we need to go back a couple of years to the time when we were first considering the possibility of going electric.

We had driven in our hybrid to Milan, an attractive city, at least in the center, and we were looking to see where the charging points were. We didn’t see many, in fact as I remember we saw 1 rapid charger and a couple of slower chargers, possibly type 3c. On the drive back to Munich, we decided that we would simulate an EV with a range of 200 Km and stop at recharging points on route. We didn’t find any rapid chargers but 1 slow charger. I  think we had the New Motion charge app with us at the time but I am not 100% sure. In any case we came to the conclusion that Italy was “difficult” for charging.

So back to the recent past and we now had our Ioniq Electric and we decided to make a tentative exploration into Italy. I had read in the GoingElectric forum of other users and trips to Italy, and one of them showed pictures of a rapid charger at the Brenner Pass. So, we decided to go there, and if possible a bit further. It was winter and therefore our range was limited. On reaching the top of the pass we drove into Brenner town, and looked without success for the charger. We saw a local police car, so we asked them where the EV charging was, and they said there wasn’t any but maybe in Vipitino which is about 30 Km down hill. We were at about 20% charge, so I was a bit worried about going further, but we rolled down hill without using any power, in fact we gained a bit. We found the charger, which was a 11 Kw Type 2 and  for an hour whilst walking around, but I was still worried. on that charger we didn’t get much of a recharge and most of what we gained we used returning back up to Brenner. 

Just outside Brenner I stopped and pulled up Apple maps, put it into satellite view and manually searched for possible charging locations. It was then I spotted the Tesla superchargers outside of Brenner on the other side of the autostrada. tracing the road back I found there was a tunnel to the other side, and we only a few meters away from it. So we got our charge, and it was free. 

Lidl, Hall in TirolNow to the present. Since the first test of Italy we had been to Vipitino a few times and once from Lago di Resia to Merano and back over the Brenner without incident. So it was time to step out the comfort zone a bit more.  I decided on the following strategy. I would drive to Brenner, and fully charge, then drive to the next charger that I found listed at Bolzen, or if the charge was ok Pagenella. From there to the next charger and so on in the direction of Verona, never letting the battery fall below circa 55%. If there was any issue with charging I would turn around and go back. 

The route went first to Hall in Tirol, to a free Lidl, where I would give a quick charge, Pagenella Oestjust enough to get up the Brenner. There I charged to 94% and started downhill “into the unknown”. Downhill I needed very little power, and it made no sense to get out at Bozen, so I continued to Pagenella, and on arrival had only used 40% of the battery.
The charger was free and worked perfectly. Here I have to say, not once was any charge point blocked by another car, and all chargers worked perfectly. Very impressive. The next stop was planned to be Affi, but I actually had enough power to get to the charger at Verona. Realistically I could have gone all the way from Brenner to Verona Veronaon the one charge if I had kept to circa 110 Km/h, but I did go to the autostrada limit of 130 Km/h which of course takes its tribute.

The charge point in Verona was also free, as was the parking, but had to be started with an app. I had already downloaded and installed the app, so after finding the correct QR code, the charge was easy. I stayed there about 2 hours, and then started the return trip. 

The return trip was, needless to say, without incident.Affi Almost. First a quick toilet break and 10 minute top up at Affi, and then onto Pagenella. This is the only incident I experienced. It poured down with rain and there was a very close lightning strike. Luckily it only lasted about 15 minutes and during this time the temperature dropped from 27C to 15C. At Pagenella, the charger was a bit out of the way but well signposted. 20 minute or so charge up to 94% again, then up to Brenner arriving with 19% (27 Km) left. All uphill of course so high consumption. My longest charge was here. 40 minutes to reach 94% When I was almost finished a Tesla X P90 driver arrived and was very interested in the Ioniq. Surprising to me was that when I told him I get a range of up to 240 Km, he said he doesn’t get much more with his Tesla. The final part of my trip was over Garmisch to Munich, which was completed in one go arriving home with 31% (74 km) battery left. 

The totals were 869 Km covered in 10:45 hours of driving (plus charge breaks), average speed 86Km/h and a consumption of 13.2 kWh/100 Km.  Overall I think a good day and certainly a successful trip.

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Neuburg an der Donau

On a rather grey Thursday with  about 19c I decided to go for a drive. I didn’t really know where to go, but I just wanted to get out for a few hours. A quick look at the map and a pin in a random town not too far away, that I hadn’t been to before. A second quick check on the ChargEV app to see what Charging was available and then off. 

Neuburg an der Donau was the target. It’s about an hours drive away but in the 29 years i have lived in Munich, I have never been there. The route took me first on the Autobahn direction Ingolstadt and I thought I might make a quick top up at the Tank&Rast but I decided I had enough charge  to get there and back home again. As I drove by the Tank&Rast I saw that there were a large quantity of police and it looked like there was something going on, so it was probably a food idea not to stop. 

I turned of the Autobahn shortly after and drove across country via Schrobenhausen and it’s asparagus fields eventually crossing the Donau and parking at a small car park 10 minutes away from the old town. The parking was free as was the type 2 charger. The charger needs to be activated by an RFID card, I used the Maingau card. 

The old town of Neuburg an der Donau was very quite. It is full of historic buildings, a couple of cafes and very few stores. In this area is also the tourist information office and the theatre. There is also the old castle which now has a museum in it.  The new or lower town was not so interesting but it is where you feel M.D. most of the stores and restaurants. 

I must have spent a couple of hours there in total. The sun had come out and it was about 21C. Returning to the Ioniq I had about 81% charge. For the trip back I went first in the direction of Augsburg and cross country until I reached Odelzhausen where I rejoined the Autobahn back to Munich. 

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Does size matter?

I was watching a YouTube video the other day and it got me thinking. Is there an incorrect focus on battery capacity? Should the focus be more on the efficiency of the EV? I don’t know of anyone who went to buy a fossil car who asked “How big is the fuel tank?”. On the other hand, I do know a lot who ask “What is the l/100Km (mpg)?”. Come to think of it, I can’t recall ever asking “How far can I drive on a full tank?” either. 

There is a fundamental problem here. Consumers, and dealers, are fixated on battery capacity instead of the more important efficiency of the car. Think of the Tesla Model S for a moment. P60, P75, P90, P100. All based on battery capacity. Yet the Tesla isn’t really so efficient, I think somewhere over 22kWh/100Km. Imagine if you went into a fossil car showroom and they said, “This SUV has a 60ltr tank, or you can have this one with a 100ltr”  then you go down the road and the dealer says there “This city car has a 34ltr tank” and you never asked how much fuel it actually used. Maybe the SUV is using 15ltr/100Km, and the city car is using 7ltr/100km. Which is really better when you consider all factors, such as cost of fuel in addition to range? 

My Ioniq has a usable battery capacity of 28kWh, I understand there is actually more, but its a sort of buffer/reserve. This is currently giving me a range of about 200Km, and then with a rapid charger I can refill in 20 minutes or so, depending on charge level, to 94%.  In comparison, the new Nissan Leaf has a 40kWh and according to the Nissan Germany website a consumption of 20.6kWh/100Km. (I will say here I am surprised it is so much, I had expected more in the region of 16kWh/100Km). Ignoring the reduced charging times due to non-existent thermal management, the Leaf takes 40-60 minutes to reach 80% after an official 415 km on from a full charge (again according to the Nissan Germany website). The website does say its possible to charge to 100% at normal speed. So a bit of simplified maths, to cover 800Km at 100Kmh.

Leaf = 8hrs driving @100Kmh +  2 x 60 minutes charging (Total 10hrs)
400km on the initial charge, then 2 charges of 80% (320Km) to reach destination

Ioniq = 8hrs driving @100Kmh + 4 x 20 minutes charging (Total 9hrs 20mins)
200km on the initial charge, then 4 charges of 94% (188Km) to reach destination

Now, before anyone says anything, yes these figures are unrealistic as for the last charge it wouldn’t be really required for the Leaf to charge to 80% but I am ignoring the Leafs reduced charge rates of only 14Kw with a hot battery. Also I took the WLTP range for the Leaf, not a real world value, and for the Ioniq I took the range shown on my car a few days ago, rather than the (unavailable) WLTP value. The calculations also take no account for breaks or whatever, but the point is, even with a smaller battery and more stops, the better efficiency makes a real difference.

So returning to my original point, shouldn’t we be focusing on efficiency when talking about EV’s and not the capacity of the battery?

The second area that also needs to be addressed is charging rate. The Ioniq can charge at up to 70Kw, the Tesla Supercharger up to 120Kw the Leaf and Ampera-e up to 50Kw and the Zoe up to 43Kw. Sounds good in principle. Realistically the Ampera-e and Leaf charge a lot slower, I am sure I read the e-Golf tops out at about 40Kw. The Zoe can charge at up to 43Kw 400V three phase AC 63A. However, at least where I live, most Type 2 chargers are 240V AC three phase 32A or 22Kw.

Charger speeds are increasing however. When you look at the next generation 350Kw rapid chargers from Ionity it is clear that in the future charging will be quicker. Lets hoe they install enough chargers. It is already an issue with cars blocking the chargers, EV that are not charging or have completed charging, or fossil cars that are just parked in EV charging bays. I do sometimes worry if the next generation Porsche Mission E cars will use the rapid chargers as personal parking spaces.

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St. Johann in Tirol

Today we just went for a short drive of about 263Km. We went exclusively over main roads, avoiding all motorways and fast route. When we set off we had an indicated range of 224Km and by the time we arrived in St Johann in Tirol we had 121Km left and a consumption of about 9.8kWh/100Km which is one of the bast I had had. We plugged into a slow charger whilst we went for a walk, and a very bad meal. We left an hour later with a range of 158Km and on the way back at one point our consumption had dropped to 7.2kWh/100Km before climbing again to end up at 9.2kWh/100Km when we parked up at home.  The weather was dry and temperature around 18-22C.

 

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“Auf diese Steine können Sie bauen“

Another day,  another trip. This time to Schwäbisch Hall in Baden-Württemberg. We left at around 9am with a full charge and a range of about 215Km. We drove along the A8 direction Stuttgart keeping up with the flow of the traffic. Usually I like to go at about 110Km on the motorway, its a good compromise between speed and fuel saving. Having said that, this stretch of motorway is very fast, and has a lot of slow moving lorries, the result is that there is a tendency to go faster and faster. I can say the Ioniq electric can move at 180Kmh, but the power soon gets drained. So we pulled off at Ulm and went to IKEA to get a free charge and something to eat. We arrived at about 10;:30 and spent about a 75 minutes charging. The Ikea charger was 20Kh so in the time there we went from 18% to 65% charge. Next we went to Wiesensteig which has beautiful wood framed houses, stopping on route at a fast charger at A8 Nellingen, I have stopped here before and had nothing but problems with the charger. Today was no different. I started the charge session with the eCharge app, and of course charging didnt start. Tried again and again the charger reported and error said charging had stopped, but in fact it did charge for 9 minutes, and then stopped. I appear to have been charge for only one session, but its so hard to tell with the terrible echarge app. Anyway we had a few more kWh of power soon to Goppingen to a charger that is in the Ioniq Navigation. It turns out this charger is in the park place for the upper management of a company and the parking place is marked as Reserved for CEO (or similar). Strangely, the charger isn’t on any of the standard charger maps, such as Going Electric, plug share, new motion etc, so I wonder if it is actually a private charger. As there were no signs to the contrary, we plugged in and had another free charge. I have not seen this type of charger before in Germany, but have
seen videos of one in the Vlog of TeslaBjorn.

The next stop was in park house P6 in Schwäbisch Hall. This is a type 2 charger, and again, free, and for 2 hours the parking cost €3. The town is well worth a visit with its old buildings. In some ways it reminded me of Sarlat in France. On returning to the Ioniq we had an indicated range of 224Km and the distance to home was 198Km. We tool the non motorway route over Nordlingen, at speeds approaching the limit on the area we were in, so between 70Kmh and 100Kmh outside towns and 50Kmh in towns. We covered in total 204Km to home without recharging on route and still had 9% battery left.

The total distance covered was 470Km and the total cost of fuel was probably €7. I say probably as I don’t know the price of the motorway charge yet and the eCharge app doesn’t show the cost.

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Tyre Change

Over the last few weeks the temperature has finally started to rise, and we are now in the mid teens to low 20 deg C. I think its safe to say winder has finally gone, if not forgotten, at least on the low grounds. So last week I gave Autohaus Sangl a call to book an appointment for my tyre change. Usually I have summer and winter complete tyre sets, but as I had the winter tyres put on the standard rims, I have this time had the summer tyres put back onto the original rims. Sometime during the next few months I will purchase rims for winter. Currently I don’t know which rims I will get but I am leaning towards an original Ioniq set. It took about 90 minutes for the 4 tyres to be refitted and balanced. The cost was just over €120 including storage of my tyres. This is in line with what I was expecting. As an aside, when I called to book the appointment, for some strange reason I was told it would be €20. I asked if that was per tyre, but was told, it was the total price. It was obvious to me this price could not possible be correct. Anyhow, my car was also washed, which was a nice surprise.

Whilst I was there I took a short recharge. I didn’t need it but I had 10 minutes to kill waiting for my appointment. Our old car that we traded in was still there, waiting for a new owner. Next to me however were 2 white Ioniqs which had a vehicle to vehicle  (V2V) system built in. The idea is that one of these Ioniqs could goto a stranded EV and recharge it enough to get to a charge point. If I understood correctly, these cars are for the ADAC.

I also discovered that I need to get my charge port exchanged on the Ioniq. Currently the parts are out of stock, and have a longer delivery time, so Sangl is going to order the required items and contact me later to arrange an appointment to install them.

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